Students turn to Minecraft during the pandemic

College students re-create campuses and plan virtual graduation, on ‘Minecraft’: Displaced Berklee College of Music, Boston University, and Emerson students are turning to the video game during the coronavirus pandemic.

Students created new “Minecraft” servers for their college community or took to social media to invite classmates back to dormant realms, where players can freely build ecosystems or battle foes. There, students — left without real-world classrooms, dorms, and dining halls to socialize in — are spending time together virtually.

“It’s a fun way to, at the very least, interact with each other,” said Ralph Drake, a junior visual media arts major at Emerson who launched the school’s “Minecraft” server on March 13. “It’s collaborative at a time when we are so separated.”

Things you can do with a Zoom virtual background

Please don’t do this in my class (we’re small enough that it would be obvious) … and if you get caught doing this in any of your other classes, please don’t tell anyone that I’m the one who told you how to do it, but that said, there might be some situations where this little trick with Zoom’s virtual background could be very handy:

 

The Magic of Chess

The Magic of Chess

What has chess taught you?

"It's just a game of concentration and that concentration will help me in everything I do."

"I think chess has taught me brain skills to help me with other things in my life."

"I learned how to be aggressive."

"It teaches you how to make a plan and making mistakes or blunders. All you have to do is try again."